futurefantasticisdead:

that guy you just called sexist? he’s the CEO of a major corporation. that guy you just called racist? he’s a cop. wait hang on I’m seeing something here

(Source: futurefantastic, via moriarty)

massconflict:

A woman kneels on the street amid tear gas during a demonstration over the fatal shooting of black teenager Michael Brown by a police officer in Missouri.
Aug. 18, 2014

massconflict:

A woman kneels on the street amid tear gas during a demonstration over the fatal shooting of black teenager Michael Brown by a police officer in Missouri.

Aug. 18, 2014

(via moriarty)

vegathebeast:

tytsports:

13-year-old Mo’Ne Davis is about to become just the 17th female to play in the Little League World Series after pitching a three-hitter to lead her team to an 8-0 victory in a Mid-Atlantic Regional championship game. She killed it. 

I see a lot of killings and police brutality all over my dash and raising awareness. But I wanna share some positive stuff going on

(via fangirling-and-tea)

nystic:

this is important please spread

(via wsswatson)

coffeeandniall:

i’ve seen a lot of people reblogging news from ferguson, wondering if the situation has changed at all. the answer is YES—massively! so i thought i would compile some updates, courtesy of alderman antonio french (who, less than 24 hours ago, was being [wrongfully] held in jail for alleged unlawful assembly). the time right now is 4:20AM CST, august 15th.

yesterday afternoon—thursday, august 14th—ferguson & stl police were taken out of control of ferguson and replaced with MO highway patrol, led by captain ron johnson, who grew up in the area. his first order of business was to order police to remove their masks and cease violent tactics.

orange cones replaced tanks, the police line vanished, not a drop of tear gas was in sight and families felt safe enough to have their young people out protesting with them. without the fear tactics and police intimidation, people came out in droves to support ferguson.

the discussion of mike brown cannot end here. the relief is palpable and the decrease of tension under johnson’s excellent leadership is a huge mercy, but justice has not been served yet. now, hopefully, citizens will get to work together with the legal system for swift and transparent justice for mike brown & the countless other black men & women across the nation who have been unlawfully treated, and in many cases died, at the hands of police. let all of us use the alleviated atmosphere to focus the conversation, focus the nation. #mikebrown 

(via moriarty)

gradientlair:

Even as Black girls and Black women from young to old are erased from history, as both supporters of justice for Black people and as ones who also experience State violence, Black girls and Black women, young to old, regularly show up. Always have. No matter what lie anyone tells you whether on Twitter or in textbooks. 

(via wsswatson)

auburnrecluse:

chescaleigh:

Robin Williams Is NOT Free (via Phoebe Gavin)

Did you know that suicide is contagious?
Yep. A great deal of research has been done on cases spanning the last three hundred years the show that suicide rates spike after a highly publicized suicide – especially when it’s a celebrity suicide.
Does that mean we shouldn’t talk about suicide or Robin Williams? No. It means we should talk about suicide and Robin Williams responsibly.
From the CDC: ASPECTS OF NEWS COVERAGE THAT CAN PROMOTE SUICIDE CONTAGION
  • Presenting simplistic explanations for suicide
  • Engaging in repetitive, ongoing, or excessive reporting of suicide in the news
  • Providing sensational coverage of suicide
  • Reporting “how-to” descriptions of suicide
  • Presenting suicide as a tool for accomplishing certain ends
  • Glorifying suicide or persons who commit suicide
  • Focusing on the suicide completer’s positive characteristics
"But Phoebe, they’re basically saying don’t talk about suicide."
No, they’re saying is don’t make it sound attractive. 

An example of what not to do: 

Robin Williams is NOT free.

Please watch this. 

This is very important. As someone who has been suicidal in the past, please know that it can get better. But it doesn’t happen like a switch- you don’t just press a button and never feel depressed again. It’s a lifelong process, pushing back the dark thoughts and choosing the light. There are good days and bad. But when you consider the altnerative, that suicide is the end of all days, the closing of all chapters, it’s worth every moment. Choose life.

(via wsswatson)

// We need to talk about Anne Frank//

historicity-was-already-taken:

As of this writing, John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars has sold over one million copies, and holds a place on several bestseller lists. The film adaptation of the book has made over two hundred million dollars in the domestic and foreign market. The book and the movie tell the story of two terminally ill American teenagers, and both contain a scene where the protagonists, Hazel and Augustus, share a kiss in the Anne Frank House. John Green made the following statement regarding the scene:

“Anne Frank was a pretty good example of a young person who ended up having the kind of heroic arc that Augustus wants—she was remembered and she left this mark that he thinks is valuable—but when he has to confront her death, he has to confront the reality that really she was robbed of the opportunity to live or die for something. She just died of illness like most people. And so I wanted him to go with a sort of expectation of her heroism and be sort of dashed.”

Here, Green makes it clear that he reads Anne Frank’s death as being from an illness like “most people,” like his protagonist. In doing so, he erases the circumstances under which she contracted typhus. “Most people” are not Ashkenazic Jewish teenage girls who contracted typhus in a concentration camp during the Holocaust. This fundamental erasure of the context of her death allowed him, those involved in the cinematic adaptation, and yes, a large portion of his readership, to accept the use of Anne Frank and her death as a prop in this American YA love story. Indeed, when further called on the issue, Green stated:

“I’ve been getting this question a lot. I can’t speak for the movie, obviously, as I didn’t make it, but as for the book: The Fault in Our Stars was the first non-documentary feature film to be granted access to the Anne Frank House precisely because the House’s board of directors and curators liked that scene in the novel a great deal. (A spokesperson recently said, ‘In the book it is a moving and sensitively handled scene.’) Abraham H. Foxman, national director of the Anti-Defamation League and a Holocaust survivor, had this to say: ‘The kissing scene in ‘The Fault in Our Stars’ in the annex of the Anne Frank House is not offensive or against who Anne Frank was. What Anne communicated in her diary was hope. She celebrated life and she celebrated hope.’ Obviously, the Anne Frank House and the ADL do not have a monopoly on Anne’s life or her legacy, but their opinions are important to me.”

I take issue with this response. Here, Green is divesting himself of responsibility for the scene, and communicating to his critics that he is not to blame, because the Anne Frank House board of directors, curators, and a Holocaust survivor approved of it. In other words, he is drawing these peoples’ assumed authority to silence criticism, and to avoid taking responsibility for the filmed version of a scene he created.

The Anne Frank House, for all the wonderful work it does, is a museum. Like all museums, it must work to attract and reach out to potential patrons. In other words, museums have to advertise because they require patrons and revenues to exist. Therefore, I read the official approval of the Anne Frank House simply as a targeted attempt to reach out to and attract a pool of untapped, younger patrons. They chose to support the filming of a sympathetic romantic scene about terminally ill teenagers in their institution to reach out to young people. While that is a sound business decision, I would argue that it’s hardly an ethical one for the Anne Frank House, an institution devoted, as per their website, to:

“the preservation of the place where Anne Frank went into hiding during the Second World War, and to bringing the life story of Anne Frank to the attention of as many people as possible worldwide with the aim of raising awareness of the dangers of anti-Semitism, racism and discrimination and the importance of freedom, equal rights and democracy,”

to support the filming of this scene. For, in Green’s own words, that scene had nothing to do with the context of Anne Frank’s death, and therefore, it did nothing to bring Anne Frank’s story to life. And it hardly raises awareness of contemporary European anti-Semitism.

As for the ADL, I very much agree with Mr. Foxman’s assessment of Anne Frank. However, what she celebrated in her life and her writings have little to do with what she has come to mean in within public memory of the Holocaust of European Jewry. Her narrative has been used by nations and educational systems to the extent that for many, she is the Holocaust; she is the face of the Holocaust. But what we inherit from her isn’t the experience of the Holocaust. That experience, and her death at Bergen Belsen take place outside the pages of her diary. Readers are never forced to experience the Holocaust through her eyes; they are able to embrace the tragedy of the Holocaust through her story while remaining removed from its experiential realities. Thus, Anne Frank becomes the Holocaust without forcing anyone to experience it. Her name can be invoked to summon tragedy, without forcing anyone to feel it.

While Anne Frank may be the face of the Holocaust of European Jewry, the memory of the experiential reality of the Holocaust is male. The way we conceptualize and remember the concentration camp experience is constructed by male narratives. More Jewish men survived the Holocaust than Jewish women. Due to attitudes towards education in the interwar period, more male Jewish survivors had the education and literary capital needed to craft enduring narratives of their experiences than did female Jewish survivors. There are three foundational male Holocaust survival narratives: Night by Elie Wiesel, Survival in Auschwitz by Primo Levi, and Maus by Art Spiegelman about his father’s Holocaust experience. Never have I seen those three men and their narratives used as a joke, or a meme, or a cheap narrative device, or as self-promotion by an American pop star.

These men are revered, and their narratives taken extremely seriously. And none of them, none of them have been used in a prop in a story about terminally ill gentile American teenagers. They survived, in perhaps the type of heroic arc a John Green protagonist would yearn for. Yet Augustus doesn’t look to them. He doesn’t share a kiss with his girlfriend at Auschwitz. He shared a kiss with her in the Anne Frank House.

Anne Frank is not a prop. She is not a symbol, she is not a teenager who happened to die of an illness, and she is not one of the canonical Jewish male survivors. She is one of many millions of Jewish women and girls who were industrially murdered like livestock, incinerated, and left in an unmarked grave. That is the story of the Holocaust of European Jewry, and that is the story of the persecution and murder of all Europeans (the disabled, Romani, Irish Travelers, homosexuals, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Communists) who failed to fit into Nazi racial and ideological constructs.

And we would all do well to remember that.

If you choose to reblog, please reblog as text (link leads to visual guide of how to do so). Thank you!

frequently asked questions
ask historicity-was-already-taken a question

I like history. i like weird. i like netfilx.